Chimes give voice to Flight 93 heroes across windy memorial site near Shanksville

Describing the concept, Los Angeles architect Paul Murdoch told Glass magazine, “Symbolically, those 40 wind chimes are a living memory representing the sound of the voices of those 40 people, many of whose last conversations where on phones with loved ones while on the plane. It’s a heroic statement, a very personal and intimate entrance to the park.”

Source: https://triblive.com/local/regional/139409...

17 years after the crash, the Flight 93 Memorial nears completion

"This is probably the most challenging and the most unique piece," Murdoch said. "Had we tried it day one, I'm not sure we could have done it."

It became an international project, with wind engineers from Colorado and Australia, a musician from upstate New York, and structural engineers from California and London.

They had to do complicated analyses of wind patterns to make sure the chimes would sound alright, and repeatedly returned to the drawing board while figuring out how they'd swing.

Murdoch said it's all worth it.


"What these 40 people did, I think inspires service in a lot of us," he said. "And I think it's a very important place for Americans to see."

Source: http://www.witf.org/state-house-sound-bite...

"Tower Of Voices" Will Complete Flight 93 National Memorial

Paul Murdoch, Founder and President of Paul Murdoch Architects, joined Robert Mangino to talk about the final piece of the Flight 93 National Memorial known as the “Tower of Voices.” The memorial will be made public on September 9th just in time for the 17th anniversary of 9/11. Paul Murdoch shared his inspiration for the design and what will go into its construction.

Source: https://omny.fm/shows/kdka-afternoon-news/...

Building the Flight 93 Memorial’s Massive Chime Tower

Using musical tuning theory, the team identified distinct tones for each chime, so that, when the wind strikes, the chimes will create a “conversation” of 40 unique voices. This meant understanding the wind direction and speed at the site, and how this would affect the sound--to figure it out, the team made recordings of chime mock-ups, used computational fluid dynamic modeling to look at potential tower shapes, tested chime configurations via acoustic simulations and used a wind tunnel to simulate conditions at the site. In winter, the wind can drive in at speeds up to 40 miles an hour, while other times of year bring much milder conditions. Murdoch and his team needed to test them all.

Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/...

Building the Flight 93 Memorial’s Massive Chime Tower

For architect Paul Murdoch, it was essential to create a design that would work with the surrounding environment, enhancing and contrasting with the natural splendor rather than attempting to overwhelm it.
“I grew up outside of Philadelphia, so I had some familiarity with that part of Pennsylvania, having camped and canoed there,” says Murdoch. “I always loved that landscape.”

Listen to the Wind Chimes Simulation

Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/...

A Tower of Voices at the Flight 93 Memorial

Murdoch and his teams have been working on the project with the National Park Service for 12 years, phasing in the landscape design and visitors center first. The tower is the crowning achievement on a number of levels.

“It sets the tone for the memorial,” he says. “It’s meant to be heroic in stature but intimate in personal experience.”

Just like the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93.

Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/...

A Tower of Voices at the Flight 93 Memorial

“We also needed a type of structural engineer who deals with moving mechanisms and dynamic forces, because the chime mechanism is our biggest technical challenge to work out,” Murdoch says.
The tower’s meant to be ever-changing with natural forces, and a one-of-kind experience for visitors at any time of day or season. There are different moods from different conditions on site.
“We’re trying to achieve that in terms of sound because it’s changing with the wind with a lot different qualities with the sound,” he says. “The winter wind is quite severe, at 30 to 40 miles per hour from the northwest, and the rest of the year it comes from different directions and lower wind speeds.”
Source: http://architectsandartisans.com/a-tower-o...

Building the Flight 93 Memorial’s Massive Chime Tower

For architect Paul Murdoch, it was essential to create a design that would work with the surrounding environment, enhancing and contrasting with the natural splendor rather than attempting to overwhelm it.

“I grew up outside of Philadelphia, so I had some familiarity with that part of Pennsylvania, having camped and canoed there,” says Murdoch. “I always loved that landscape.”

Source: http://architectsandartisans.com/a-tower-o...

“Tower of Voices” memorial will honor those lost on 9/11’s Flight 93

Dubbed The Tower of Voices and designed by Paul Murdoch Architects,  the tower will feature 40 wind chimes suspended by corbels (one for each individual lost) cast into a concrete tower. Notably, this will be the first major vertical element in an existing, expansive memorial that is almost entirely flat. The rest of the site, a bowl-like earthwork designed by Paul Murdoch Architects and Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects in 2005, is nearly three times the size of Central Park and was designed to encourage contemplation through subtle alterations and restoration of the site’s existing landscape – an old growth field and adjacent wetland. Arup is providing engineering and design consulting to simulate a 3D soundscape of the acoustic experience.
Source: https://archpaper.com/2017/09/9-11-memoria...